Canada Coffee Alicante


Roasting Coffee
When adding the green beans to the preheated roasting drum, coffee starts to develop sugars while drying. Water is evaporating and the beans turn yellow-brown. Light roasts end at 180C-190C, and typically have a light body with fruity and earthy aromas. The coffee tends to be more acidic, as the oils didn't break through to the surface.

Further roasting causes vapors and pressure to crack thru the bean. This stage is known as the First Crack (205C), when the sugars begin to caramelize and the native acids have fully developed. The roaster is now balancing the bright cleanliness of acidity with the round, sugary sweetness. Aroma and body increases throughout this stage. Medium roasts tend to have a medium brown color, with a stronger flavor and a non-oily surface.

During the last stage of roasting a.k.a. the Second Crack (225C), carbon dioxide forms and the sugars have been caramelized to a crisp. The bean loses 15% of its weight due to pyrolysis. The coffee reaches its lowest acidity and full body. The bean is now exhibiting a rich, dark color, and oily surface. Aromas are nutty and caramelly, with a slight bittersweet aftertaste.

Beyond this stage (240C) the beans are burnt black due to too much caramelization. The acidity is almost fully gone in dryer beans, oils develop on the surface, and the bean looks very shiny and black. Very dark coffee roasts lose their origin flavors and caffeine levels. The coffee aromas are spicy, smoky, and bitter or burnt, with a lighter body.

Light Roasts
Light Roasts
Light Roasts

Roast Names: Half City, Cinnamon, New England
Stage: before First Crack (185C - 200C)
Bean Surface: Dry
Acidity: Very High to High
Aroma: Medium to Strong
Sweetness: Low
Body: Thin to Full
Usage: Inexpensive Commercial Blends

Medium Roasts
Medium Roasts
Medium Roasts

Roast Names: American, City, Breakfast
Stage: during First Crack (205C - 220C)
Bean Surface: Dry
Acidity: Medium
Aroma: Very Strong
Sweetness: Medium to Strong
Body: Full
Usage: Popular in the U.S.

Dark Roasts
Dark Roasts
Dark Roasts

Stage: during the Second Crack (225C - 245C)
Roast Names: Full City, Continental, Vienna, French, Italian
Bean Surface: Shiny Surface
Acidity: Low to Very Low
Aroma: Medium to Weak
Sweetness: Medium to Very Low
Body: Full to Thin
Usage: Specialty Roasters

Black Roasts
Black Roasts
Black Roasts

Stage: beyond Second Crack (245C - 250C)
Bean Surface: Totally Shiny
Acidity: None
Aroma: Burnt
Sweetness: None
Body: Extremely Thin

Although the outside surface of the coffee bean can appear sufficiently dark in colour, it is not a direct indication of the roast degree in depth. The development of delicious flavours is achieved by precisely roasting the inside of the bean. A too light interior colour denotes an underdeveloped roast and results in undesirable savoury flavours (grass, stem, peanut shell, corn, wheat).

Packaging and Labeling
After roasting coffee continues to emit carbon dioxide, so it's left to rest before bagging. Although commercial-grade coffee is sold in attractive packaging, marketing superlatives such as "premium", "quality", and "traditional" do not provide any relevant information about the product. Transparency is the hallmark of a great product: roasting date, provenance and traceability, expected flavor. Roasted coffee is best maintained fresh in an air-tight and dark packaging, in a dry and cool place.

Valve
Valve
Valve

The sealed bag has a one-way degassing valve to allow more gases to escape but oxygen cannot enter and stale it.

Roasting Date
Roasting Date
Roasting Date

The bag should have the roasting date on it, not an expiry date.

Roast Level
Roast Level
Roast Level

An indication of roast level is useful, but the language used to communicate roast is not standardized. "Medium roast" could be any shade of brown depending on who you ask.

Provenance
Provenance
Provenance

The label should say what species/variety the coffee is, where it was grown, and whether it’s a blend or single origin.

Traceability
Traceability
Traceability

The name of the farm, altitude, region, and country. The more traceable a coffee is, the better are the chances that it has been handled with care throughout its journey to your cup.

Expected Flavour
Expected Flavour
Expected Flavour

Information on how the coffee was processed, and cupping notes will describe the expected flavour.

Continue to the coffee brewing methods